Christian Faith in Action

Words of the Priest / Palabras del Sacerdote

Grace and Peace to you my brothers and Sisters:

Happy Valentine’s day!!! Today is the day that we all celebrate love. Of course, the celebration refers to romantic love. I hope you have a good time with those loved ones. This is a great day to celebrate the love that you have for each other. I think, the key to love others, is in our own ability to bring/add meaning to the life of that person. Of course, sometimes things get complicated, especially when we put the whole responsibility on the other person to give meaning to our lives. Meaning in life does not depend on how much you are loved or love the other person. We find meaning in our lives when we discover our true potential and live the path God has given to each one of us, a path that is particular and singular to each one. Only then, we can have meaning in life and then help others to find their meaning. To dream in the hope that other human being will fulfill our entire being is to put so much unjust pressure on that person. We find our meaning and place in life and then share that path with other people, which in turn become meaningful relationships and lives for all involved.

My brothers and sisters, God is Love. Love is what binds us together as one. Love is what allows us to cross any barrier. Love is what pushes us to take a step towards the unknown. No wonder why Saint Paul will present love as the central Christian virtue that illuminates and transforms all other virtues. For Paul, if one does not have love, he/she is nothing. I will invite you to reflect on chapter 13 of the First Letter of Saint Paul to the Corinthians. There we find the most wonderful reflection about love. I hope we are all able to live loving relationships that reflect Paul’s rendition of Love. God is Love, remember. When we love we are participating in the very essence of God. A while back, I preached about using this passage as tool for an examination of conscience in our life. In place of love we can put our names and pray with it.  

I want us to start preparing for Lent. Lent is around the corner. Next Wednesday, February 17 is Ash Wednesday. Please have that in mind as you prepare your Lenten spiritual journey. The theme I was thinking of for this Lent could be: Finding the small oasis in the desert. We have had a year with the pandemic; and we all feel that we are in a desert mode. All our regular activities in our lives have changed. We have not been able to be ourselves. That’s very challenging for many of us. I compare this time for us to the time that Jesus and Israel spent in the desert. That was a very harsh time.  I bet they needed a small oasis to refresh and recuperate. We all need to look for the small Oasis in our lives to refresh ourselves. Certainly, this year we all have had those moments in the midst of the pandemic: zoom parties, facetime calls, drive-by parties and you name it. For our Lenten project I want us to share that oasis of ours with others. We will work on providing water for 86 families in El Rodeo, Cochabamba, in Bolivia. More information will come on Ash Wednesday.

Blessings,

Juan M. Camacho

2-14-21


Gracia y paz a ustedes mis hermanos y hermanas:

Feliz día de San Valentín!!! Hoy es el día en que todos celebramos el amor. Por supuesto, la celebración se refiere al amor romántico. Espero que la pasen muy bien con esos seres queridos. Este es un gran día para celebrar el amor que se tienen el uno por el otro. Creo que la clave para amar a los demás está en nuestra propia capacidad darle/agregar valor a la vida de la otra persona. Por supuesto, a veces las cosas se complican, sobre todo cuando ponemos toda la responsabilidad en la otra persona para que le de sentido a nuestras vidas. El significado de la vida no depende de cuánto te aman o aman a la otra persona. Encontramos sentido en nuestras vidas cuando descubrimos nuestro verdadero potencial y vivimos el camino que Dios nos ha dado a cada uno de nosotros. Un camino particular y singular para cada uno. Solo entonces podremos encontrarle sentido a la vida y luego ayudar a otros a encontrarle ese sentido.

Soñar con la esperanza de que otro ser humano satisfaga todo nuestro ser es presionar injustamente a esa persona. Primero encontramos sentido y lugar a nuestra propia vida y luego compartimos ese camino con otras personas, que a su vez se convierte en relaciones y significativas para todos.

Mis hermanos y hermanas, Dios es Amor. El amor es lo que nos une como uno. El amor es lo que nos permite traspasar cualquier barrera. El amor es lo que nos empuja a dar un paso hacia lo desconocido. No es de extrañar que san Pablo presente el amor como la virtud cristiana central que ilumina y transforma todas las demás virtudes. Para Pablo, si uno no tiene amor, no es nada. Los invito a reflexionar sobre el capítulo 13 de la Primera Carta de San Pablo a los Corintios. Allí encontramos la reflexión más maravillosa sobre el amor. Espero que todos podamos vivir relaciones amorosas que reflejen la interpretación del amor de San Pablo. Dios es Amor, recuerda. Cuando amamos, participamos de la esencia misma de Dios. Hace un tiempo, prediqué sobre el uso de este pasaje como herramienta para el examen de conciencia en nuestra vida. En el lugar del amor podemos poner nuestros nombres y orar con él.

Quiero que comencemos a prepararnos para la Cuaresma. La Cuaresma está a la vuelta de la esquina. El próximo miércoles 17 de febrero es el miércoles de ceniza. Tenga esto en cuenta al preparar su camino espiritual de Cuaresma. El tema que estaba pensando para esta Cuaresma podría ser: Encontrar el pequeño oasis en el desierto. Hemos tenido un año con la pandemia; y todos sentimos que estamos en modo desierto. Todas nuestras actividades habituales en nuestras vidas han cambiado. No hemos podido ser nosotros mismos. Eso es muy desafiante para muchos de nosotros. Comparo este tiempo para nosotros con el tiempo que Jesús e Israel pasaron en el desierto. Fue una época muy dura. Apuesto a que necesitaban un pequeño oasis para refrescarse y recuperarse. Todos necesitamos buscar el pequeño Oasis en nuestras vidas para refrescarnos. Ciertamente, este año todos hemos tenido esos momentos en medio de la pandemia: fiestas de zoom, llamadas Facetime y lo que sea. Para nuestro proyecto de Cuaresma quiero que compartamos ese oasis nuestro con los demás. Trabajaremos en el abastecimiento de agua a 86 familias en El Rodeo, Cochabamba, Bolivia. Tendremos más información el miércoles de ceniza.

 Bendiciones

Juan M. Camacho

2-14-21

 






Grace and Peace to you my brothers and sisters:

For a person who grew up on perfect spring-like weather, when weather is rarely an inconvenience in one’s life, to experience a “snow day” was quite a gift from Mother Nature. Parish offices were closed, and I was hunkered down in my house. Since I recovered from COVID I have been trying to catch up with work and responsibilities, and it was almost impossible. There are always new things to be done, and the old pile was still a pile. The snow day gave me the opportunity to catch up with many small projects that I had put aside. As I sat down to have a moment of quiet time and reflection while contemplating the snow, I came across a phrase from Richard Rohr: “To pray and say ‘Thy Kingdom come’, we must be able to say ‘my kingdoms go’”.  That made me think of one more weekly responsibility which I hadn’t tackled yet: this small note in the bulletin which I enjoy doing and sharing with you. It keeps me connected to you.

Back to the note, this Sunday we hear Jesus in the synagogue casting out demons. I was impressed with the question of the evil spirits -what do you want from us? I couldn’t help but think about our own personal “evil spirits” that we may have: Our own selfishness telling Jesus: do you want me to be more generous? No way! Or our own desire for power telling Jesus: do you want me to be humble? Nah! Or our own desire for possessiveness telling Jesus: do you really want me to let go? Tough one!  Can you imagine the many “small evil spirits” that may inhabit our lives?

When I think about evil spirits in the Gospel; I don’t necessarily think about those movie type of spirits like images from the Exorcist movie: a person walking on the walls and roofs screaming in a weird way. I don’t deny Jesus may have encountered those. But in the synagogue, a holy place, the stories could have been simpler and yet profound. It would be something like people just amazed at the power of Jesus’ words and teachings. People were amazed at the radicality of his message and the challenges he posed to their lives. The Kingdom of God required conversion and transformation. It required that all the people in the synagogue let go of those evil and mean sides of them in order to become true followers of God’s will. It meant that they needed to die to their old selves to be renewed in Christ.

The beginning of the ordinary time is full of stories about preaching the Kingdom of God and disciples following Jesus. In order to make God’s Kingdom present in our lives we must let go of our own “kingdoms and mean spirits” that keep us prisoners--our own kingdoms that do not allow God’s Kingdom to shine in our lives. We must allow the authority of Jesus’ voice to penetrate into our hearts and lead us to change and transformation. As the snow falls and makes all clean and neat; we must allow Christ’s Word to come into our lives and transform the ugliness that is within us with newness of life.

Blessings,

Juan M Camacho

1-31-21


Gracia y Paz a ustedes mis hermanos y hermanas:

Para una persona que creció en un clima perfecto, el clima rara vez es un inconveniente en la vida, experimentar un "día de nieve" fue un gran regalo de la madre naturaleza. Las oficinas parroquiales estaban cerradas y yo estaba refugiado en mi casa. Desde que me recuperé de COVID he estado tratando de ponerme al día con el trabajo y las responsabilidades y es casi imposible. Siempre hay cosas nuevas por hacer, reuniones que atender, personas que atender y la pila vieja de cosas sigue quedándose sin tocar. El día de nieve me dio la oportunidad de ponerme al día con muchos proyectos pequeños que había dejado de lado. Mientras paraba un momento para disfrutar la tranquilidad de la nieve y reflexionar mientras contemplaba la nieve, encontré esta frase de Richard Rohr “Para rezar y decir -Venga tu Reino-, debemos poder decir primero -que se vayan mis reinos-. Eso me hizo pensar en una responsabilidad semanal más que aún no he abordado. Esta pequeña nota sobre el boletín que disfruto hacer y compartir con ustedes. Es una buena manera de mantenerme conectado con ustedes.

Volviendo al boletín, este próximo domingo escucharemos en el evangelio a Jesús en la sinagoga echando fuera demonios. Me impresionó la pregunta que los espíritus malignos le hacen a Jesús: ¿qué quieres de nosotros? No pude evitar pensar en nuestros propios "espíritus malignos" personales que podemos tener. Nuestro propio egoísmo diciéndole a Jesús: ¿quieres que sea más generoso? ¡De ninguna manera! O nuestro propio deseo de poder diciéndole a Jesús: ¿quieres que sea humilde? ¡No! O nuestro propio deseo de posesividad diciéndole a Jesús: ¿de verdad quieres que te deje ir? ¡Bien difícil! ¿Te imaginas los muchos "pequeños espíritus malignos" que pueden habitar nuestras vidas?

Cuando pienso en los espíritus malignos del Evangelio, necesariamente no creo que sean como esos espíritus del mundo de las películas como “el exorcista”: una persona poseída que camina por las paredes y los techos gritando de una manera extraña. No niego que Jesús pudo haberse encontrado con ellos. Pero en la sinagoga, un lugar sagrado, las historias podrían haber sido más simples y a la vez más profundas. Sería algo así como personas simplemente asombradas por el poder de las palabras y enseñanzas de Jesús. La gente estaba asombrada por la radicalidad de su mensaje y los desafíos que planteaba a sus vidas. El reino de Dios requería conversión y transformación. Se requería que todas las personas en la sinagoga dejaran de lado esas actitudes malvados y mezquinas para convertirse en verdaderos seguidores de la voluntad de Dios. Significaba que los ancianos necesitaban morir a sus viejos hábitos para ser renovados en Cristo.

El comienzo del tiempo ordinario está lleno de historias sobre la predicación del Reino de Dios y los discípulos que siguen a Jesús. Para que el reino de Dios esté presente en nuestras vidas, debemos dejar ir nuestros propios "reinos y espíritus malos" que nos mantienen prisioneros. Nuestros propios reinos que no permiten que el Reino de Dios brille en nuestras vidas. Debemos permitir que la autoridad de la voz de Jesús penetre en nuestro corazón y nos lleve al cambio y la transformación. Como cae la nieve y deja todo limpio y ordenado; debemos permitir que la Palabra de Cristo entre en nuestras vidas y transforme la fealdad que hay dentro de nosotros con novedad de vida en Cristo.

Bendiciones,

Juan M Camacho

1-31-21





Grace and Peace to you all:

Ordinary time is here to stay with us for a while. It doesn’t mean that it is not a special liturgical time. It is a time in which we reflect on the ordinary moments of Jesus’ ministry and not in the context of the big moments (birth, passion and rising). We will dive into his teachings and preaching on the hills and valleys of Galilee, the  normal days in and days out in the ministerial life of the Lord. It is in those moments that sometimes don’t seem to matter and yet they are full of God’s presence.

This weekend’s readings relate precisely those ordinary times in the life of Eli, Samuel, Andrew, John and Jesus. On any given day Samuel hears the voice of God calling him; but he is unable to recognize God. The story goes back and forth, Samuel thinking that it is Eli calling him. It took him three times for Eli to recognize that God was calling Samuel. Eli helps Samuel to recognize God’s voice and to become a servant of the Lord. What a beautiful role Eli plays in the life of Samuel. When God called Samuel again, he was ready to listen. He said: “Speak, for your servant is listening.” Let us be mindful of this ordinary time because it is imbued with God’s presence. We just need to attune our ears and hearts to listen and be aware that God can make an extraordinary appearance in any given moment of our lives.

Just as Samuel and Eli discovered God’s voice in the daily routine of their lives, two of John the Baptist’s disciples also found Jesus. Imagine these two followers of John on that morning. They woke up and probably had something to eat and headed down by the river to listen to John. As they were listening to him, they noticed that John pointed out Jesus as a special person. Out of their curiosity, they decided to follow Jesus. When they came close to him, he noticed they had been following him and asked them about their business. They manifested that they wanted to see where he lived and in that moment their lives changed and they became followers of Jesus. There is nothing special about that day for them and yet that was an extraordinary moment in their lives. They came to listen to John one more time and instead they found the messiah.

As we begin this ordinary time, let us keep in tune with God’s presence. Each moment of our lives has the potential to become an extraordinary moment in which our lives change for the best. These two disciples found their messiah and after that they ran to invite others to follow Jesus.

Blessings and Happy Ordinary Time.

Juan M Camacho

1-17-21


Gracia y paz a todos ustedes:

 

Damos comienzo en nuestra liturgia al tiempo ordinario. No significa que no sea un tiempo litúrgico especial. El tiempo ordinario es un tiempo que reflexionamos sobre los momentos cotidianos del ministerio de Jesús y no en el contexto de los grandes momentos de su vida (nacimiento, pasión y resurrección). Nos sumergiremos en sus enseñanzas y predicación en las colinas y valles de Galilea. Los días normales de la vida ministerial del Señor. Es en esos momentos que a veces no parecen importar y, sin embargo, están llenos de la presencia de Dios.

 

Las lecturas de este fin de semana relatan precisamente esos momentos ordinarios en la vida de Elí, Samuel, Andrés, Juan y Jesús. Un día cualquiera Samuel escuchó la voz de Dios que lo llamaba; pero no puede reconocer a Dios. La historia se desarrolla entre un ir y venir de Samuel pensando que es Elí llamándolo. Les tomó tres veces a Elí y Samuel para reconocer que Dios estaba llamando a Samuel. Elí ayuda a Samuel a reconocer la voz de Dios y a convertirse en un siervo del Señor. Qué papel tan hermoso juega Elí en la vida de Samuel. Cuando Dios volvió a llamar a Samuel, él estaba listo para escuchar. Él respondió: "Habla, porque tu siervo está escuchando". Tengamos presente este tiempo ordinario porque está imbuido de la presencia de Dios. Solo necesitamos sintonizar bien nuestros oídos y corazones para escuchar y ser conscientes de que Dios puede hacer una aparición extraordinaria en cualquier momento de nuestras vidas.

 

Así como Samuel y Elí descubrieron la voz de Dios en la rutina diaria de sus vidas; dos de los discípulos de Juan el Bautista también encontraron a Jesús. Imagínese a estos dos seguidores de Juan esa mañana. Se despertaron y probablemente comieron algo y se dirigieron al río para escuchar a Juan. Mientras lo escuchaban, notaron que Juan señalaba a Jesús como una persona especial. Por curiosidad, decidieron seguir a Jesús. Cuando se acercaron a él, Jesús notó que lo habían estado siguiendo y les preguntó por sus negocios. Manifestaron que querían ver dónde vive y en ese momento sus vidas cambiaron y se convirtieron en seguidores de Jesús. No había nada especial en ese día para ellos y, sin embargo, fue un momento extraordinario en sus vidas. Venían a escuchar a Juan una vez más y en lugar encontraron al mesías.

 

Al comenzar este tiempo ordinario, sigamos sintonizados con la presencia de Dios. Cada momento de nuestras vidas tiene el potencial de convertirse en un momento extraordinario en el que nuestras vidas cambian para mejor. Los dos discípulos encontraron a su mesías y luego salieron en busca de otros para invitarlos a seguir a Jesús.

 

Bendiciones y Feliz Tiempo Ordinario.

Juan M Camacho

1-17-21






Grace and Peace to you my brothers and sisters in Christ:

We are finishing our Advent preparation. I hope we have been able to meet some of the goals that we set at the beginning of Advent. On a personal note, I can say that I learned to be a bit more flexible. In the last few weeks several things that I had planned didn’t work out the way I expected. So, I was able in my prayer to accommodate to the new reality. I decided to recognize God’s hands in all that happens around me. I learned to be a bit more patient and trust in the Lord. It was a process of surrendering to the Lord and allowing the work of his hands to shape my path, to quote the prophet Isaiah. What about you? Any improvement in your spiritual life?

This coming week we are celebrating Christmas. This year’s celebration will be different and peculiar. It is a unique Christmas, a once in a lifetime experience. It is like the first Christmas. Think for a moment about that first Christmas when Joseph and Mary were seeking a place to have their baby. They knew he was the “Immanuel”; but they didn’t fully comprehend what it meant. It was the first time; they didn’t have 2000 experiences of Christmas and traditions. For them, it was just their baby being born. Nonetheless, there was much commotion, angels, shepherds, sheep, bulls, donkeys, magi, camels, big stars and so many new things for Mary and Joseph. What an experience! Have you ever thought about that? I find myself thinking about in this time of Pandemic. In my 38 years of life this is the first time that Christmas will be celebrated in a different and unique way.

This Christmas for us: it is a bit like Joseph and Mary’s first Christmas to us, only in reverse. Due to COVID we cannot have the big commotions that we organize around Christmas time. Many of us, we will celebrate in a simple and austere way without the big commotion around Christmas: a simple get-together with our household inhabitants in a very special and solemn way. We priests of my Community are already thinking about the austere and simple way we are going to celebrate. In a way, it is a bit like the phrase “Keep Christ in Christ-mas”. This time we will not have many invitations or events to attend. We will be able to focus completely in the mystery we celebrate. God became one like us. I hope you can do the same in your household. Let us go back to the first Christmas in the simplicity and yet very meaningful event for our lives.

I invite you to spend your Christmas time in gratitude focusing on the blessings you have been receiving throughout this time of pandemic. Maybe you won’t be able to have the full house, the noise, the music, the chats and all that, but you have Jesus with you. Make a special space for Him in your home in this Christmas time.

Blessings,

Juan M. Camacho

12-15-20


Gracia y paz a ustedes mis hermanos y hermanas en Cristo:

Estamos terminando nuestra preparación de Adviento. Espero que hayamos podido alcanzar algunas de las metas que nos propusimos al principio de Adviento. A título personal, puedo decir que aprendí a ser un poco más flexible. En las últimas semanas, varias cosas que había planeado no salieron como esperaba y en mi oración pude acomodarme a la nueva realidad. Decidí reconocer las manos de Dios en todo lo que sucede a mi alrededor. Aprendí a ser un poco más paciente y a confiar en el Señor. Fue un proceso de entrega al Señor y permitir que el trabajo de sus manos moldee mi camino como diría el profeta Isaías. ¿Qué ha pasado con sus metas? ¿Alguna mejora en su vida espiritual?

La semana que viene celebramos la Navidad. La celebración de este año será diferente y particular. Es una Navidad única. Una experiencia de una vez en la vida. Es como la primera Navidad. Piense por un momento en esa primera Navidad cuando José y María buscaban un lugar para tener a su bebé. Sabían que él era el "Emmanuel"; pero no comprendían completamente lo que significaba. Fue la primera vez; no tuvieron 2000 experiencias de Navidad y tradiciones para celebrar. Para ellos, era solo el nacimiento de su bebé. Sin embargo, había mucha conmoción, ángeles, pastores, ovejas, toros, burros, magos, camellos, grandes estrellas y tantas cosas nuevas para María y José. ¿Que experiencia única? ¿Alguna vez han pensado en eso? Me pongo ahora pensar en eso en este momento de Pandemia. En mis 38 años de vida esta es la primera vez que la Navidad se celebrará de una manera diferente y única.

Esta Navidad es para nosotros un poco como la primera Navidad de José y María, solo que al revés. Debido al COVID no podemos tener las grandes conmociones que organizamos en Navidad. Muchos de nosotros, lo celebraremos de una manera sencilla y austera sin la gran conmoción que rodea a la Navidad. Un simple encuentro con los habitantes de nuestra casa de una manera muy especial y solemne. Los sacerdotes de mi Comunidad ya estamos pensando en la forma austera y sencilla que vamos a celebrar. En cierto modo, se parece un poco a la frase "Mantener a Cristo en la Navidad". Esta vez no tendremos muchas invitaciones o eventos a los que asistir. Podremos concentrarnos por completo en el misterio que celebramos. Dios se convirtió en uno como nosotros. Espero que pueda hacer lo mismo en su hogar. Volvamos a la primera Navidad en la sencillez y, sin embargo, un evento muy significativo para nuestras vidas.

Los invito a pasar su tiempo navideño en agradecimiento enfocándose en las bendiciones que han estado recibiendo durante este tiempo de pandemia. Tal vez no puedas tener la casa llena, el ruido, la música, las charlas y todo eso, pero tienes a Jesús contigo. Haga un espacio especial para Él en su hogar en esta época navideña.

Bendiciones

Juan M. Camacho

12-15-20






From Fr. Antony
My Dear Family: As I write that dear word, “family”, I’m pondering the role family usually plays in our preparation and celebration of Christmas. Many of our hearts are struggling to be merry and bright this season. Our caution, and concern for the safety of loved ones, prevent our gathering this Christmas. They will also cause us to give up some traditions for this year and to reduce the amount of shopping and the number of people with whom we will exchange gifts.
But, on Christmas, we will still honor the arrival of a much beloved member of our family, Jesus Christ. When we celebrate the birth of someone we love, we often ask them, “What do you want for your birthday?” They may want a certain toy, or a new dress, a short vacation or something new for the house. Because we love them, we will do whatever we can to fulfill their wish and make them happy. If you posed that same query to Jesus, “What do you want for your birthday?” what do you think he would request of you? Fortunately, Jesus answered that question long ago, without ever being asked: feed the hungry, clothe the naked, shelter the homeless, welcome the stranger and visit the sick and imprisoned. Unlike many of us, what he seeks are things to make the lives of others better. That is what will make him happy. That is the gift we can give him in return for his great love.
There are many people within our own communities that are struggling to provide food for their families, to clothe them against the cold, and to keep a roof over their heads. The idea of a special Christmas meal or presents under the tree is a dream beyond imagining. Perhaps this year, as we are unable to be with our own families for gifts and meals, we can bring the joy of Christmas to these deserving members of our extended family. This can be done in a variety of ways: donations to your parish for needy parishioners who come to their door; donations to St. Vincent de Paul who help pay rent or utilities; financial support to local food banks who feed the hungry or to organizations that reach out to help the homeless. As we provide life’s necessities for these dear ones, we will bring Christ’s light into their lives. In doing so, we will find it shining brightly in our hearts and homes as well. Let us pray:
Dear Jesus,
Your birthday is fast approaching.
It should be a time of anticipation and joy for all.
As I prepare to celebrate you, help me select the perfect gift.
Guide my “shopping” with your benevolent wish list.
Whisper to me of the need you see, and help me to see it, too.
Open the door of my heart to welcome family I’ve never met.
Let me wrap in generous acts my compassion for others,
tie it with a bow of hope and place it lovingly before your manger bed,
the perfect gift for you, my Savior and my God. AMEN
 
12-8-20

Del Padre Antony
Mis queridas familias:
Mientras escribo esa hermosa palabra, "familia", estoy reflexionando sobre el papel que suele desempeñar la familia en nuestra preparación y celebración de la Navidad. Muchos de nuestros corazones están luchando por ser felices y estar alegres en esta temporada. Sin embargo, nuestras preocupaciones y precauciones que debemos tomar por la pandemia para la seguridad de nuestros seres queridos impiden que nos reunamos esta Navidad. También tendremos que renunciar a algunas tradiciones en este año y reducir la cantidad de compras y la cantidad de personas con las que intercambiaremos regalos.
Pero, en Navidad, aún honraremos la llegada de un miembro muy querido a nuestra familia, la venida del niño Jesús. Cuando celebramos el nacimiento de alguien que amamos, a menudo le preguntamos: "¿Qué quieres para tu cumpleaños?" Es posible que quieran cierto juguete, un vestido nuevo, unas vacaciones cortas o algo nuevo para la casa. Por el amor que les tenemos, haremos todo lo posible para cumplir su deseo y hacerlos felices. Si le hicieras la misma pregunta a Jesús, ¿Qué crees que te pediría? Afortunadamente, Jesús respondió a esa pregunta hace mucho tiempo, sin que nunca nadie le haya preguntado: “Quiero alimentar al hambriento, vestir al desnudo, albergar al desamparado, acoger al extraño y visitar a los enfermos y a los presos”. A diferencia de muchos de nosotros, lo que busca son cosas para mejorar la vida de los demás. Eso es lo que lo hará feliz. Ese es el regalo que podemos darle a cambio de su gran amor.
Hay muchas personas dentro de nuestras propias comunidades que están luchando para darles comida a sus familias, para vestirlas contra el frío y tener un techo que los cubra. Para mucha gente la idea de una comida especial para Navidad o encontrar regalos debajo del árbol es un sueño que solo está en su imaginación. Quizás este año, como no podemos estar con nuestras propias familias para recibir regalos y comidas, podamos llevar la alegría de la Navidad a esas personas necesitadas y hacerlos sentir parte de nuestra familia. Esto se puede hacer de varias formas: donaciones a su parroquia para los feligreses necesitados que llegan, donaciones a través de San Vicente de Paul, que ayudan a pagar el alquiler o recibos de nuestros hermanos necesitados; apoyo financiero a los bancos de alimentos locales que dan comida a los hambrientos o a organizaciones que se dedican a ayudar a los que no tienen un techo. A medida que ayudemos a cubrir las necesidades de los necesitados, que también son nuestros hermanos, llevaremos la luz de Cristo a sus vidas y también la encontraremos brillando intensamente en nuestros corazones y en nuestros hogares. Oremos
Querido Jesús,
Tu cumpleaños se acerca rápidamente. Debe ser un momento de anticipación y alegría para todos.
Mientras me preparo para celebrar tu venida, ayúdame a seleccionar el regalo perfecto.
Guía mis "compras" con tu benevolente lista de deseos.
Susúrrame las necesidades que ves y ayúdame a verlas yo también.
Abre la puerta de mi corazón para dar la bienvenida a una familia que nunca he conocido.
Déjame involucrarme en actos generosos y sentir compasión por los demás,
Dame una luz de esperanza y colócala amorosamente ante tu pesebre, este será el regalo perfecto para mí. AMÉN
 
12-8-20





Grace and Peace to you brothers and sisters in Christ:

As you already know by now, I am a nature lover. It helps that I am a farmer and grew up in the mountains of Colombia in close contact with nature. The thing that I love the most is to spend time in contact with nature and contemplate God’s beauty in it. A few days ago, early in a cold morning, I was having my first cup of coffee of the day and as I looked out the window, I saw a fairly well-nourished squirrel carrying leaves from the ground up into the nest on the top of a tree. She run up and down in a frenzy mode to bring as many leaves as possible to her nest. There was a certain rush in her movements; which surprised me, given the fact that it was really early in the morning and there were not more squirrels or nothing that will disrupt her work. So, why would she run in a frenzy carrying leaves and preparing her nest? There is something ingrained in their nature that all the squirrels know that winter is coming; and they need to prepare. They need to do it and do it sooner than later. They spend most of Fall working hard to be ready for Winter. They are committed to this preparation. They take it very seriously.

This weekend we are beginning the Season of Advent and with it a new liturgical year. In Church Advent is a time of preparation. We prepare to receive Christ in Christmas. We prepare for the nativity of Our Lord. In Advent we are given four weeks to get ready to receive Christ. But this preparation should not be only for Christmas and to receive Christ once in our lifetime. For us Christians, our faith is a life of preparation to meet the Lord not only in Christmas, in every day of our lives but also at the end of times. This pilgrimage on earth for each one of us is a time of preparation. We all know that. We even speak about it and we even have seasons to prepare for it and yet unlike the squirrels we don’t seem to rush in our preparation. I don’t mean our decorations in our homes but in our hearts. The nest that the Lord will use in us: our hearts. We expect the coming of our Lord, but we don’t know the time and the moment. We can plan very well our lives, but we will never be able to plan the Lord’s coming. For that we don’t need schedule or calendars; we need to rush into making our lives and hearts the perfect nest for that coming. We need to do it even if there is not body else doing it. We need to rush in our preparations because we know one thing for sure and it is: the Lord is coming.

As we begin Advent, I want us to reflect in our disposition to prepare our lives for the coming of the Lord. How enthusiastic about it we are. How committed are we? How well are we doing it? Do we take our own initiative, or we wait for others to take it? Let us imitate the nature in preparing for what is happening next. Let’s prepare our hearts and lives for the Lord.

Blessings,

Juan M. Camacho

11-29-20


Gracia y paz a ustedes hermanos y hermanas en Cristo:

Como ya saben a estas alturas, soy un amante de la naturaleza. Ayuda que soy de rancho y crecí en las montañas de Colombia en estrecho contacto con la naturaleza. Lo que más me encanta es pasar tiempo en contacto con la naturaleza y contemplar la belleza de Dios en ella. Hace unos días, temprano en una mañana fría, estaba tomando mi primera taza de café del día y mientras miraba por la ventana, vi una ardilla bastante bien alimentada que llevaba hojas del suelo al nido en la parte superior de un árbol. Corría arriba y debajo de una manera frenética para traer tantas hojas como fuera posible a su nido. Había cierta rapidez en sus movimientos; lo cual me sorprendió, dado que era muy temprano en la mañana y no había más ardillas ni nada que interrumpiera su trabajo. Entonces, ¿por qué correría frenéticamente cargando hojas y preparando su nido? Hay algo arraigado en su naturaleza que todas las ardillas saben que se acerca el invierno; y necesitan prepararse. Necesitan hacerlo y hacerlo lo más temprano pronto posible. Pasan la mayor parte del otoño trabajando duro para estar preparados para el invierno. Están comprometidas con esa preparación. Se lo toman muy en serio.

Este fin de semana comenzamos el tiempo de Adviento y con él un nuevo año litúrgico. En la Iglesia, el Adviento es un tiempo de preparación. Nos preparamos para recibir a Cristo en Navidad. Nos preparamos para la natividad de Nuestro Señor. En Adviento tenemos cuatro semanas para prepararnos para recibir a Cristo. Pero esta preparación no debe ser solo para Navidad y para recibir a Cristo una vez en nuestra vida. Para nosotros los cristianos, nuestra fe es una vida de preparación para encontrarnos con el Señor no solo en Navidad, ni todos los días de nuestra vida, sino también al final de los tiempos. Esta peregrinación por la tierra para cada uno de nosotros es un tiempo de preparación. Todos sabemos eso. Incluso hablamos de ello e incluso tenemos temporadas para prepararnos y, sin embargo, a diferencia de las ardillas, no parece que nos apresuremos en nuestra preparación. No me refiero a nuestras decoraciones en nuestros hogares, sino en nuestros corazones. El nido que el Señor usará en nosotros: nuestro corazón. Esperamos la venida de nuestro Señor, pero no sabemos el momento. Podemos planificar muy bien nuestras vidas, pero nunca seremos capaces de planificar la venida del Señor. Para eso no necesitamos agendas ni calendarios; tenemos que apresurarnos a hacer de nuestras vidas y corazones el nido perfecto para esa venida. Tenemos que hacerlo incluso si no hay nadie m[as haciéndolo. Necesitamos apresurarnos en nuestros preparativos porque sabemos una cosa con certeza y es que: el Señor viene.

Al comenzar el Adviento, quiero que reflexionemos en nuestra disposición para preparar nuestras vidas para la venida del Señor. Cuán entusiasmados estamos al respecto. ¿Qué tan comprometidos estamos? ¿Qué tan bien lo estamos haciendo? ¿Tomamos nuestra propia iniciativa o esperamos que otros la tomen? Imitemos la naturaleza al prepararnos para lo que sucederá a continuación. Preparemos nuestros corazones y nuestras vidas para el Señor.

Bendiciones,

Juan M. Camacho

11-29-20






Grace and Peace to you brothers and sisters in Christ:

As you already know by now, I am a nature lover. It helps that I am a farmer and grew up in the mountains of Colombia in close contact with nature. The thing that I love the most is to spend time in contact with nature and contemplate God’s beauty in it. A few days ago, early in a cold morning, I was having my first cup of coffee of the day and as I looked out the window, I saw a fairly well-nourished squirrel carrying leaves from the ground up into the nest on the top of a tree. She run up and down in a frenzy mode to bring as many leaves as possible to her nest. There was a certain rush in her movements; which surprised me, given the fact that it was really early in the morning and there were not more squirrels or nothing that will disrupt her work. So, why would she run in a frenzy carrying leaves and preparing her nest? There is something ingrained in their nature that all the squirrels know that winter is coming; and they need to prepare. They need to do it and do it sooner than later. They spend most of Fall working hard to be ready for Winter. They are committed to this preparation. They take it very seriously.

This weekend we are beginning the Season of Advent and with it a new liturgical year. In Church Advent is a time of preparation. We prepare to receive Christ in Christmas. We prepare for the nativity of Our Lord. In Advent we are given four weeks to get ready to receive Christ. But this preparation should not be only for Christmas and to receive Christ once in our lifetime. For us Christians, our faith is a life of preparation to meet the Lord not only in Christmas, in every day of our lives but also at the end of times. This pilgrimage on earth for each one of us is a time of preparation. We all know that. We even speak about it and we even have seasons to prepare for it and yet unlike the squirrels we don’t seem to rush in our preparation. I don’t mean our decorations in our homes but in our hearts. The nest that the Lord will use in us: our hearts. We expect the coming of our Lord, but we don’t know the time and the moment. We can plan very well our lives, but we will never be able to plan the Lord’s coming. For that we don’t need schedule or calendars; we need to rush into making our lives and hearts the perfect nest for that coming. We need to do it even if there is not body else doing it. We need to rush in our preparations because we know one thing for sure and it is: the Lord is coming.

As we begin Advent, I want us to reflect in our disposition to prepare our lives for the coming of the Lord. How enthusiastic about it we are. How committed are we? How well are we doing it? Do we take our own initiative, or we wait for others to take it? Let us imitate the nature in preparing for what is happening next. Let’s prepare our hearts and lives for the Lord.

Blessings,

Juan M. Camacho

11-22-20


Gracia y paz a ustedes hermanos y hermanas en Cristo:

Como ya saben a estas alturas, soy un amante de la naturaleza. Ayuda que soy de rancho y crecí en las montañas de Colombia en estrecho contacto con la naturaleza. Lo que más me encanta es pasar tiempo en contacto con la naturaleza y contemplar la belleza de Dios en ella. Hace unos días, temprano en una mañana fría, estaba tomando mi primera taza de café del día y mientras miraba por la ventana, vi una ardilla bastante bien alimentada que llevaba hojas del suelo al nido en la parte superior de un árbol. Corría arriba y debajo de una manera frenética para traer tantas hojas como fuera posible a su nido. Había cierta rapidez en sus movimientos; lo cual me sorprendió, dado que era muy temprano en la mañana y no había más ardillas ni nada que interrumpiera su trabajo. Entonces, ¿por qué correría frenéticamente cargando hojas y preparando su nido? Hay algo arraigado en su naturaleza que todas las ardillas saben que se acerca el invierno; y necesitan prepararse. Necesitan hacerlo y hacerlo lo más temprano pronto posible. Pasan la mayor parte del otoño trabajando duro para estar preparados para el invierno. Están comprometidas con esa preparación. Se lo toman muy en serio.

Este fin de semana comenzamos el tiempo de Adviento y con él un nuevo año litúrgico. En la Iglesia, el Adviento es un tiempo de preparación. Nos preparamos para recibir a Cristo en Navidad. Nos preparamos para la natividad de Nuestro Señor. En Adviento tenemos cuatro semanas para prepararnos para recibir a Cristo. Pero esta preparación no debe ser solo para Navidad y para recibir a Cristo una vez en nuestra vida. Para nosotros los cristianos, nuestra fe es una vida de preparación para encontrarnos con el Señor no solo en Navidad, ni todos los días de nuestra vida, sino también al final de los tiempos. Esta peregrinación por la tierra para cada uno de nosotros es un tiempo de preparación. Todos sabemos eso. Incluso hablamos de ello e incluso tenemos temporadas para prepararnos y, sin embargo, a diferencia de las ardillas, no parece que nos apresuremos en nuestra preparación. No me refiero a nuestras decoraciones en nuestros hogares, sino en nuestros corazones. El nido que el Señor usará en nosotros: nuestro corazón. Esperamos la venida de nuestro Señor, pero no sabemos el momento. Podemos planificar muy bien nuestras vidas, pero nunca seremos capaces de planificar la venida del Señor. Para eso no necesitamos agendas ni calendarios; tenemos que apresurarnos a hacer de nuestras vidas y corazones el nido perfecto para esa venida. Tenemos que hacerlo incluso si no hay nadie m[as haciéndolo. Necesitamos apresurarnos en nuestros preparativos porque sabemos una cosa con certeza y es que: el Señor viene.

Al comenzar el Adviento, quiero que reflexionemos en nuestra disposición para preparar nuestras vidas para la venida del Señor. Cuán entusiasmados estamos al respecto. ¿Qué tan comprometidos estamos? ¿Qué tan bien lo estamos haciendo? ¿Tomamos nuestra propia iniciativa o esperamos que otros la tomen? Imitemos la naturaleza al prepararnos para lo que sucederá a continuación. Preparemos nuestros corazones y nuestras vidas para el Señor.

Bendiciones,

Juan M. Camacho

11-22-20






Grace and Peace to you all:

I am impressed with the amount of people who came out to vote. I have to make a confession. I used to be one of those millennials who didn’t care much for voting. I used to take pride on spending all my entire life without voting. Of course, I also have the excuse that for the last 18 years I have lived outside my own country. So, I haven’t been able to vote in the countries where I have lived because I am not a citizen. I have had several heated conversations on this point with friends and family on my apathy to politicians (I still don’t trust politicians) and voting. I am not proud of being that way. In the last couple of years, I have come to understand that voting is not only a right; but a duty. As a good citizen and Christian, I cannot shy away from my duties. I need to vote in good conscience for candidates that I consider will serve best the interests of the whole nation. OK, enough about confessing my sins in public. My only hope is that the younger generations see voting as a duty and a responsibility that they cannot shy away from. I hope people grow in their understanding that voting is not just a right. It is much more and makes a huge difference. Everyone should vote and make their voices heard. Imagine a society in which all its voting members will come out to vote. The world would be great, and democracy would be awesome.

What I wanted to mention is that as I write this article millions of Americans are voting. Millions of Americans have voted also by exercising early election opportunities. We don’t know the results yet, but by the time you read this note we will know who the next president will be for us. Whether the result is what you wanted or not; we need to have in mind our entire country. We cannot continue the polarization and division that we have experienced in the last few months. If we are to build the country that we want, the country that the Founding Fathers foresaw, we need to put our differences aside and work together. Of course, this note is not going to be read by any of the politicians and powers to be; but it is being read by you. We all can start to bring our local communities back together. We need to start building bridges with those we have grown apart from these past few months. It is sad to see friends lose their friendships because of the differences in political views, families divided because of that, communities polarized due to the different views. The Gospel of Christ invites us to love one another as members of the same family. Jesus doesn’t command us to think all alike. He commands us to love one another.

This Sunday’s readings invite us to seek God’s wisdom. God’s wisdom is ready to be found for all those who seek it. As a country we need to seek unity and fraternity. We will find it if we all work for it. Whatever the result of the elections is, let us commit all of us to work for unity and fraternity in our fragmented country. You all know where to start. Let us not shy away from that responsibility to live out the Gospel in its fullness.

Blessings,

Juan M. Camacho

11-8-20


Gracia y paz a todos ustedes:

Estoy impresionado con la cantidad de gente que salió a votar. Tengo que hacer una confesión. Solía ​​ser uno de esos millennials a los que no les importaba mucho votar. Solía ​​estar orgulloso de pasar toda mi vida sin votar. Por supuesto, también tengo la excusa de que durante los últimos 18 años he vivido fuera de mi propio país. Entonces, no he podido votar en los países en los que he vivido porque no soy ciudadano. He tenido varias conversaciones acaloradas sobre este punto con amigos y familiares sobre mi apatía hacia los políticos (todavía no confío en los políticos) y la votación. No estoy orgulloso de ser así. En los últimos años he llegado a comprender que votar no es solo un derecho; sino un deber. Como buen ciudadano y cristiano, no puedo rehuir mis deberes. Necesito votar en conciencia por los candidatos que considero que servirán mejor a los intereses de toda la nación. Okay. Basta de confesar mis pecados en público. Mi única esperanza es que las generaciones más jóvenes y nosotros los inmigrantes veamos el voto como un deber y una responsabilidad que no podemos eludir. Espero que la gente comprenda que votar no es solo un derecho. Es mucho más y marca una gran diferencia. Todos deberían votar y hacer oír su voz. Imagínese una sociedad en la que todos sus miembros votantes salieran a votar. El mundo seria otra cosa y la democracia asombrosa.

Lo que quería mencionar es que mientras escribo este artículo están votando millones de estadounidenses. Millones de estadounidenses también han votado por aprovechar las oportunidades de elecciones anticipadas. Aún no conocemos los resultados, pero cuando lean esta nota sabremos quién será el próximo presidente para nosotros. Si el resultado es lo que deseaba o no; debemos tener en cuenta la totalidad de nuestro país. No podemos continuar con la polarización y división que hemos experimentado en los últimos meses. Si queremos construir el país que queremos, el país que previeron los Padres fundadores, tenemos que dejar de un lado nuestras diferencias y trabajar juntos. Por supuesto, esta nota no va a ser leída por ninguno de los políticos y poderes futuros; pero usted lo está leyendo. Todos podemos empezar a unir a nuestras comunidades locales. Necesitamos comenzar a construir puentes con aquellos a quienes nos hemos distanciado en estos pocos meses. Es triste ver a los amigos perder sus amistades debido a las diferencias en los puntos de vista políticos, las familias divididas por eso, las comunidades polarizadas por los diferentes puntos de vista. El Evangelio de Cristo nos invita a amarnos como miembros de una misma familia. Jesús no nos manda que pensemos todos igual. Nos manda a amarnos unos a otros.

Las lecturas de este domingo nos invitan a buscar la sabiduría de Dios. La sabiduría de Dios está lista para ser encontrada por todos aquellos que la buscan. Como país, debemos buscar la unidad y la fraternidad. Lo encontraremos si todos trabajamos para ello. Sea cual sea el resultado de las elecciones, comprometámonos todos a trabajar por la unidad y la fraternidad en nuestro fragmentado país. Todos saben por dónde empezar. No evitemos esa responsabilidad de vivir el Evangelio en su plenitud.

Bendiciones,

Juan M. Camacho

11-8-20






Grace and Peace to you:

One particular thing about Fall is the fishermen at the Root River catching salmon. On any given afternoon we can see dozens of fishermen out there: sons and fathers together, multiple generations out there to have a good catch. I did some research on the Steelhead facility that is down there by the river in Lincoln Park. I found out a lot of interesting things. Then, I got curious about the life of salmon. I had a friend of mine who is a fisherman explain to me all the different kinds of salmon and migrations out there. Then, I went down to the river and spent some time in prayer, watching salmon swim against the current upriver. Some of them die and others continue their journey. One thing that one can easily see is that salmon don’t give up; they are swimming against all their obstacles because they are on a journey for life. It may seem absurd to our eyes--the many jumps and hardships that they go thru to continue their journey. They have it engrained in them that their mission in life is to make this long trip to pass on their life and die. Their cycle of life is clear, and they fulfill it.

 As I prayed watching the salmon making their way upriver, I thought of the times we find small and insignificant obstacles in life and give up. Reflecting on Pope’s Francis encyclical on human friendship and fraternity, I wonder if we let the small obstacles of language, ethnicity, economic status and so many other insignificant things get in the way of true human friendship and fraternity. For Christians as for salmons, our journey is to overcome all the obstacles to bring to life a true sense of fraternity. I invite you to pray and reflect about that. 

I also prayed about my own journey in life. Every one of us has a special way in life, a journey offered to us by God. We need to discern his journey and find it in our pilgrimage on this earth. Salmon seem to have a clarity in their journey, and they push forward nonstop, with just a little bit to rest. I wonder if we have the same clarity in our own spiritual journeys. I invite you to pray about it and reflect on your journey of faith. Are we pressing forward? Are we on the right track? Are we advancing? Did we even know our own journey? I hope these questions lead you to pray about it and come closer to God’s journey for you.

Blessings,

Juan M Camacho

10-25-20


La Gracia de Cristo y la Paz de Dios para todos ustedes:

Una cosa en particular acerca de otoño es los pescadores en el río capturando salmones. En una tarde cualquiera podemos ver a decenas de pescadores por ahí. Padres e hijos juntos pescando. Varias generaciones juntas tratando de pescar un salmón bien grande. Investigué un poco sobre las instalaciones de Steelhead que están junto al río en Lincoln Park y descubrí muchas cosas interesantes. Después de ver eso me entró curiosidad por los salmones. Tengo un amigo mío, que es pescador, y me explico todos los diferentes tipos de salmones y migraciones que hay. Luego, bajé al río y estuve en oración viendo a los salmones nadar contra la corriente río arriba. Algunos mueren y otros continúan su camino. Una cosa que uno puede ver fácilmente es que los salmones no se rinden, nadan contra todos sus obstáculos porque están en un viaje por la vida.

A nuestros ojos puede parecernos absurdo los muchos saltos y dificultades que pasan para seguir su camino. Tienen arraigado en ellos que su misión en la vida es hacer este viaje vital que es dar vida y morir. Su ciclo de vida lo tienen muy claro y lo cumplen.

 Mientras oraba viendo a los salmones abrirse camino río arriba, pensé que en los tiempos en que encontramos obstáculos pequeños e insignificantes en la vida y nos rendimos. Reflexionando sobre la encíclica del Papa Francisco sobre la amistad y la fraternidad humanas, me pregunto si dejamos los pequeños obstáculos del idioma, la etnia, el estatus económico y tantos otros insignificantes para interponernos en el camino de la verdadera amistad y fraternidad humanas. Tanto para los cristianos como para los salmones, nuestro camino es superar todos los obstáculos para dar vida a un verdadero sentido de fraternidad. Los invito a rezar y reflexionar sobre eso.

También pensaba en oración acerca de mi propio peregrinar de vida. Cada uno de nosotros tiene una forma de vida especial. Un peregrinar que nos ofrece Dios en particular a cada uno de nosotros. Este peregrinar necesitamos discernirlo y encontrarlo en nuestra vida. Los salmones parecen tener claridad en su caminar y avanzan sin parar. Solo un poquito para descansar. Me pregunto si tenemos la misma claridad en nuestro propio caminar espiritual. Los invito a reflexionar en ello y a reflexionar sobre su camino de fe. ¿Estamos avanzando? estamos en el camino correcto? ¿Conocemos siquiera nuestro propio caminar? Espero que estas preguntas  nos ayuden a orar al respecto y acercarnos más al viaje que Dios nos encomendó a cada uno de nosotros.

Bendiciones,

Juan M Camacho

10-25-20






Grace and Peace to all of you:

Pope Francis continues to challenge us with his teachings. He has done it in the past in his encyclical Laudato Si and many other speeches and letters to people of God. His Ignatian spirituality is the basis for his deeper commitment to find God in everyday events and his commitment to discern God’s will at all times. Probably, that’s the reason for his teachings and writings to be more practical than dogmatical and hence more challenging for our daily lives. In his new encyclical, Pope Francis teaches us about human fraternity. That is something so basic, and yet it seems that we have grown so detached from that reality—a reality that we hold sacred: all created equal at the image of God. His desire is that by acknowledging the dignity of each human person we can contribute to the rebirth of a universal aspiration to fraternity. Fraternity between all men and women.

Pope Francis is not afraid to critique the different social constructs of our times. His encyclical is a tough read but at the same time a great invitation to follow Christ’s teachings. Pope Francis is not afraid of sounding politically incorrect. He reminds me of Jesus in his approach to challenging the governing and religious people of his time, as we have seen, especially in his parables on the past Sundays, which are all directed to the chief priests and elders of Jerusalem. Francis, in his encyclical “Fratelli Tutti”, invites us to make an exercise of spiritual discernment in our lives. His intention is to invite us to measure ourselves on a daily basis against the Gospel values. This is a tough challenge for us. The invitation is to live our faith at all times with profound conviction. He uses the parable of the Good Samaritan to help us understand our commitment to become neighbors to others.  

I want to give a special caveat for reading the encyclical: we need to understand Pope Francis’ cultural background. He is from the Latino/Hispanic cultures, with a worldview which is more communitarian as opposed to the more individualistic worldview of the Anglo-Saxon cultures. There is nothing wrong with these two visions of the world, but it is very important to understand the difference when we sit down to read the encyclical. Some of the passages may sound different or harsh to Anglo-Saxon ears than others. I just invite you to read the encyclical with an open mind to see the profound wealth of spiritual content for our daily lives that it provides for us.

Blessings my brothers and sisters,

Juan M Camacho  

10-18-20


Gracia y paz a todos ustedes:

El Papa Francisco continúa desafiándonos con sus enseñanzas. Lo ha hecho en el pasado en su encíclica Laudato Si y en muchos otros discursos y cartas al Pueblo de Dios. Su espiritualidad ignaciana es la base de su compromiso más profundo por encontrar a Dios en los acontecimientos cotidianos. Su compromiso de discernir la voluntad de Dios en todo momento. Probablemente, esa es la razón por la que sus enseñanzas y escritos son más prácticos que dogmáticos y, por lo tanto, más desafiantes para nuestra vida diaria. En su nueva encíclica, el Papa Francisco nos enseña sobre la fraternidad humana. Algo tan básico como eso y, sin embargo, parece que nos hemos distanciado tanto de esa realidad. Una realidad que consideramos sagrada: todos creados iguales a imagen de Dios. Su deseo es que reconociendo la dignidad de cada persona humana podamos contribuir al renacimiento de una aspiración universal a la fraternidad. Fraternidad entre todos los hombres y mujeres.

El Papa Francisco no tiene miedo de criticar las diferentes construcciones sociales de nuestro tiempo. Su encíclica es una lectura difícil, pero al mismo tiempo una gran invitación a seguir las enseñanzas de Cristo. El Papa Francisco no teme sonar políticamente incorrecto. Me recuerda a Jesús en su enfoque para desafiar a las personas gobernantes y religiosas de su tiempo. Como hemos visto especialmente en sus parábolas de los últimos domingos, todas dirigidas a los principales sacerdotes y ancianos de Jerusalén. Francisco, en su encíclica “Fratelli Tutti”, nos invita a hacer un ejercicio de discernimiento espiritual en nuestra vida. Su intención es invitarnos a medirnos a diario con los valores del Evangelio. Este es un desafío difícil para nosotros. La invitación es vivir nuestra fe en todo momento con profunda convicción. Utiliza la parábola del buen samaritano para ayudarnos a comprender nuestro compromiso de convertirnos en prójimos de los demás.

Quiero hacer una advertencia especial para leer la encíclica: necesitamos comprender el trasfondo cultural del Papa Francisco. El Papa Francisco es hispano como nosotros con una cosmovisión más comunitaria frente a la cosmovisión más individualista de las culturas anglosajonas. No hay nada de malo en estas dos visiones del mundo, pero es muy importante entender la diferencia cuando nos sentamos a leer la encíclica. Algunos de los pasajes pueden sonar diferentes o duros para los oídos anglosajones que otros. Solo los invito a leer la encíclica con la mente abierta para ver la profunda riqueza de contenido espiritual para nuestra vida diaria que nos brinda.

Bendiciones mis hermanos y hermanas,

Juan M Camacho

10-18-20